Short Blocks

Maths Year 1/2 Spring Measures and Data

Each unit has everything you need to teach a set of related skills and concepts.

First time using Hamilton Maths?
Open Unit 1 and download the PowerPoint from 'Planning and Group Activities': a brilliant and ready-to-use maths lesson for your white board!

The PowerPoint incorporates step-by-step teaching, key questions, an in-depth mastery investigation, problem-solving and reasoning questions - in short, everything you need to get started.

All the other resources are there to support as-and-when required. Explore at your leisure - and remember that we are always here to answer your questions.

Unit 1 Compare and measure weight (suggested as 2 days)

Objectives

Compare and measure weight
Unit 1: ID# 12492

Y1: Compare and measure weight
Y2: Compare and measure weight

National Curriculum
Y1: Meas (i) (ii)
Y2: Meas (i) (ii)

Y1 Hamilton objectives
17. Compare objects according to weight using appropriate mathematical language.
18. Count uniform non-standard to measure weight.

Y2 Hamilton objectives
25. Choose/use appropriate standard units to estimate and measure weight to the nearest appropriate unit using scales and instruments.
26. Compare and order objects according to weight, using suitable units, and record the results using >, < and =.

Planning and Activities

Day 1
Put a potato in one side of a bucket balance and a pebble in the other side. Explain that the heavier object makes the balance go down on that side. Let children ‘be a balance’, like a see-saw, with arms outstretched. Pass round 100g weights. Children suggest things which are lighter and things which are heavier.
Group Activities: T with Y1
Y1 -- Compare objects to the weight of a book, finding objects heavier and lighter. Some children will order the objects from lightest to heaviest.
Y2 -- Compare everyday objects with 100g and 1kg weights.

Day 2
Put an apple on one side of a balance scale, then put marbles on the other until the scale balances. Count the marbles. Draw a pictogram. Repeat with other objects.
Further Teaching with Y2
Explain the need for standard measures. Show 1kg, 1g and 100g weights. Weigh a shoe in 100g steps.
Group Activities: T with Y2
Use the ‘Ten to the kilo’ in-depth problem-solving investigation below as today’s group activity.
Or, use these activities:
Y1 -- Use bricks to estimate and weigh different pieces of fruit/vegetables.
Y2 -- Weigh items, such as cooking ingredients, to the nearest 100g.

You Will Need

  • Items to weigh: large pebble, potato, bag of potatoes, cotton wool, books
  • Bucket balance scales
  • Kitchen scales
  • 1kg weight, 100g weights, 1g weights
  • ‘Heavier and lighter’ (see resources)
  • ‘Comparing Weights’ recording sheet (see resources)
  • ‘Weighing Tins’ activity sheet (see resources)
  • A selection of objects to weigh, e.g. books of different sizes, bag of potatoes, bag of rice or sugar (weighing exactly 1kg), bag of apples
  • 2 large sheets of paper
  • Marbles, wooden bricks (or similar uniform objects)
  • Fruit and vegetables, including an apple
  • Tins of food with the weight on the labels covered
  • Flapjack ingredients

Short Mental Workouts

Day 1
Estimating and comparing

Day 2
Left and right

Worksheets

Day 1
Y1: Compare weight of common items using own experience.
Y2: Sort objects into categories by weight: <100g and >100g.

Day 2
Y1: Determine the weight of objects on scales, balanced with bricks. Answer questions relating to weight.
Y2: Record weight by counting 100g weights on balance scales; classify as <500g or >500g.

Mastery: Reasoning and Problem-Solving

Y1

  • Which is heavier:
    (i) A potato or a pebble?
    (ii) A book or a shoe?
    (iii) A soft toy or a paint pot?
    Use a bucket balance to find out.
  • Sometimes, always, never true...
    -- A book is the same weight as 12 marbles
    -- A shoe is heavier than a sock?
    -- A big handful of cotton wool is lighter than three 50p coins?
  • Weigh two of your favourite books using wooden bricks. Write their weight. Which weighs more?

Y2

  • Does each item weigh more or less than 100g?
    -- A ruler
    -- Can of lemonade
    -- A hard-boiled egg
    Check using a balance scale.
  • How many 100g weights balance 1 kilogram?
  • Match each object to one of the weights:
    tin of beans
    bag of sugar
    grapefruit
    feather
    box of books
    --
    1 gram
    3 kilograms
    400 grams
    1 kilogram
    200 grams

In-depth investigation: Ten to the kilo
Children use estimation and accurate measurement skills to find exactly ten items which weigh precisely one kilogram.

Unit 2 Measure and represent capacity (suggested as 3 days)

Objectives

Measure and represent capacity
Unit 2: ID# 12508

Y1: Compare and measure capacity
Y2: Compare and measure capacity

National Curriculum
Y1: Meas (i) (ii)
Y2: Meas (i) (ii); Stats (i) (ii) (iii)

Y1 Hamilton objectives
17. Compare objects according to capacity, using appropriate mathematical language.
18. Count uniform non-standard, then simple standard units to measure capacity.

Y2 Hamilton objectives
25. Choose/use appropriate standard units to estimate and measure capacity to the nearest appropriate unit using scales and instruments.
26. Compare and order objects according to capacity, using suitable units, and record the results using >, < and =.

Planning and Activities

Day 1
Show two containers with different capacities and of different proportions. Fill the larger with coloured water. Pour into the smaller. Then vice versa. Which has the larger capacity? Rehearse vocabulary ‘full’, ‘half full’, ‘nearly full’, ’empty’, ‘nearly empty’.
Further Teaching with Y2
Show a 2-litre plastic bottle with a strip of paper glued to its length. Use cups to fill it, and mark the scale in cups (1 cup, 2 cups, and so on). Then use the bottle to measure the capacity of a large jug in cups. Show a block graph, children guess which container is which.
Group Activities: T with Y2
Y1 -- Rotate: (1) Match labels to pictures of containers. (2) Compare and order containers by capacity.
Y2 -- Rotate: (1) Match containers and capacities. (2) Make and use measuring bottles, draw a block graph.

Day 2
Introduce the litre. Mark half a litre on a jug. Find which containers can hold more or less than half a litre.
Group Activities: T with Y1
Y1 -- Rotate: (1) Sort containers into two groups. Estimate how many egg cups of sand each container holds. (2) Estimate and measure container capacity.
Y2 -- Rotate: (1) Estimate and begin to measure capacities. (2) Gain an improved understanding of 1 litre as a measure of capacity.

Day 3
Show children four bowls, all of different sizes. These bowls were left in the Three bears’ house! Measure capacity by filling each bowl with cups of water. Demonstrate how to draw a pictogram to record the capacities of the bowls measured in numbers of cups.
Further Teaching with Y2
Introduce the millilitre, and steps of 100ml on a litre measuring jug. Show four different size bottles, of different proportions. As a group, order them according to estimates of capacity.
Group Activities: T with Y2
Use the ‘Fill the bucket’ in-depth problem-solving investigation below as today’s group activity.
Or, use these activities:
Y1 -- Create a pictogram to show the capacity of the three bears’ bowls.
Y2 -- Measures bottles’ capacities to the nearest 100ml. Draw and discuss a pictogram of the class’s favourite drinks.

You Will Need

  • Various containers to measure their capacity, e.g. a water bottle, a teacup, a small teapot, a fromage frais/yoghurt pot, an egg cup, a vase
  • Empty 2-litre plastic bottle
  • Strip of paper
  • Washing-up bowl; Water/coloured water
  • Plastic cups; Funnel; Water jug; Towels
  • A prepared block graph showing the capacity of four containers in cupfuls
  • ‘Empty and full’ (see resources)
  • ‘Comparing capacities’ (see resources)
  • ‘More or less than a litre’ (see resources)
  • ‘Pictogram to show the capacity of the three bears’ bowls’ (see resources)
  • ‘Blank pictogram’ (see resources)
  • Litre measuring jug; A 1 litre bottle
  • Marker pen
  • Sand
  • Four different-sized bowls
  • Four bottles of different proportions

Short Mental Workouts

Day 1
Say 1 or 10 more

Day 2
Know number bonds to 10

Day 3
Number bonds to 10

Worksheets

Day 1
Y1: Draw levels showing how full the containers are.
Y2: Create a block graph to show different bottle capacities. Answer questions about the graph.

Day 2
Y1: Compare container capacities.
Y2: Sort a variety of containers under headings: more than 1 litre and less than 1 litre.

Day 3
Y1: Create a pictogram to show different container capacities. Answer questions about the pictogram.
Y2: Estimate and order container capacity relative to half a litre and 1 litre.

Mastery: Reasoning and Problem-Solving

Y1

  • How many cups full of sand would it take to fill a tray from the maths equipment cupboard?
    -- Make a good guess.
    -- Write it down.
    -- Use cups to measure and check.
  • Make a cone out of paper. Estimate how many egg cups of lentils or rice it will hold. Measure to check your estimate.
  • How many cups more does your water bottle hold when it is full, than it does when it is half empty?

Y2

  • Estimate how many egg cups will fill each of these:
    A yoghurt pot
    A mug
    Half an orange when the edible part is gone!
  • Laila has just spilled a quarter of a litre of juice from a 1-litre measuring jug. There is now a half a litre in the jug. How much juice was in the jug before some was spilled?
  • Use paper to create a cone. Fill it with dried lentils or beans. Is this less than or more than half a litre? Can you make a cone that holds exactly half a litre?
  • Jay found two part-used bottles of squash in the kitchen cupboard. He poured them both into one bottle and discovered that he had quarter of a litre in total. How much more would he need to make 1 litre?

In-depth investigation: Fill the bucket
Children estimate then measure the capacity of a bucket, and play a game filling it.

Extra Support

Y1: Don’t Drink the Water!
Compare capacity by direct comparison

Y2: Pouring Potions
Compare capacity of two or three containers by direct comparison